AP World History Practice Test Chapter 2

AP World History Practice Test Chapter 2: You can also download the Advanced Placement exam 2024 full-length review practice test in printable pdf.

The AP World History Prep Practice Test for Chapter 2 is an advanced, meticulously crafted study tool that aims to test your understanding of the pivotal transformations that shaped the early stages of human civilizations. This chapter revolves around the development and interactions of early societies, with an emphasis on the River Valley Civilizations and their significant contributions.

This practice test adheres to the standards and structure of the actual AP exam, providing an accurate reflection of what you can expect in the real test. The content of the test includes a blend of multiple-choice questions, short answer prompts, and essay-style questions, each focusing on diverse aspects of your comprehension of the Chapter 2 content.

The multiple-choice questions in this test evaluate your factual recall and interpretation of major historical developments, cultural shifts, and advancements. You may encounter questions that ask about the evolution of political systems, technological innovations, or the cultural and religious practices in these early societies.

AP World History Practice Test Chapter 2

Chapter 2
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AP World History Practice Test Chapter 2

AP World History Practice Test

Chapter 2: The Neolithic Revolution and Early Agricultural Societies
Total Items: 15 MCQs
Time Limit: N/A

1 / 15

THE NEOLITHIC REVOLUTION, C. 10,000 B.C.E. TO C. 2000 B.C.E.

Which of the following most likely contributed to the adoption of agriculture throughout the world as depicted on the map?

2 / 15

THE NEOLITHIC REVOLUTION, C. 10,000 B.C.E. TO C. 2000 B.C.E.

Cultivation of crops depicted on the map had all of the following effects EXCEPT

3 / 15

THE NEOLITHIC REVOLUTION, C. 10,000 B.C.E. TO C. 2000 B.C.E.

Which of the following conclusions is best supported by the information on the map?

4 / 15

THE NEOLITHIC REVOLUTION, C. 10,000 B.C.E. TO C. 2000 B.C.E.

 

Based on your knowledge of world history, which of the following best describes the lifestyle of human communities in the areas on the map that did not adopt agriculture?

5 / 15

Questions refer to the following two images.

ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE AT CATALHÖYÜK, TURKEY, CIRCA 7500 B.C.E

Image 1

RE-CREATION OF A TYPICAL HOME OF CATALHÖYÜK, TURKEY, CIRCA 7000 B.C.

Which of the following contributed most directly to the rise of Neolithic settlements as shown in the images?

6 / 15

Questions refer to the following two images.

ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE AT CATALHÖYÜK, TURKEY, CIRCA 7500 B.C.E

Image 1

RE-CREATION OF A TYPICAL HOME OF CATALHÖYÜK, TURKEY, CIRCA 7000 B.C.

The architectural style depicted in Image 1 best supports which of the following conclusions?

7 / 15

Questions refer to the following two images.

ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE AT CATALHÖYÜK, TURKEY, CIRCA 7500 B.C.E

Image 1

RE-CREATION OF A TYPICAL HOME OF CATALHÖYÜK, TURKEY, CIRCA 7000 B.C.

The objects in Image 2 best illustrate which of the following developments in the period before 600 B.C.E.?

8 / 15

Questions refer to the passage below.

“The agriculture practiced by these first women farmers and
their children, producing enough food for subsistence only,
must be distinguished from that agriculture which developed
out of subsistence farming and which produced surpluses and
fed nonfarming populations in towns. The first type is
commonly called horticulture and is carried out with hand
tools only. The second is agriculture proper, and involves
intensive cultivation with the use of the plow and (where
necessary) irrigation. In areas like the hilly flanks of the
fertile crescent in the Middle East, horticulture moved fairly
rapidly into agriculture as it spread to the fertile plains. As we
shall see, trading centers grew into towns and cities needing
food from the countryside. Women and children could not
unaided produce the necessary surpluses, and by the time the
digging stick had turned into an animal-drawn plow, they
were no longer the primary workers of the fields.

The simpler form of farming continued in areas where the
soil was less fertile, and particularly in the tropical forest
areas of Africa. Here soils were quickly exhausted, and each
year the village women would enlist the men in helping clear
the fields which were then burned over in the slash-and-burn
pattern which helped reconstitute the soils for planting
again.... Where the simple horticultural methods continued to
be used, women continued as the primary farmers, always
with their children as helpers. In a few of these societies
women continued also in the positions of power; these are
usually the tribes labeled by ethnologists as matrilocal.”

Elise Boulding, historian, The Underside of History: A View of
Women Through Time, 1976

Based on Boulding’s argument, the rise of patriarchal societies were most clearly influenced by which of the following?

9 / 15

Questions refer to the passage below.

“The agriculture practiced by these first women farmers and
their children, producing enough food for subsistence only,
must be distinguished from that agriculture which developed
out of subsistence farming and which produced surpluses and
fed nonfarming populations in towns. The first type is
commonly called horticulture and is carried out with hand
tools only. The second is agriculture proper, and involves
intensive cultivation with the use of the plow and (where
necessary) irrigation. In areas like the hilly flanks of the
fertile crescent in the Middle East, horticulture moved fairly
rapidly into agriculture as it spread to the fertile plains. As we
shall see, trading centers grew into towns and cities needing
food from the countryside. Women and children could not
unaided produce the necessary surpluses, and by the time the
digging stick had turned into an animal-drawn plow, they
were no longer the primary workers of the fields.

The simpler form of farming continued in areas where the
soil was less fertile, and particularly in the tropical forest
areas of Africa. Here soils were quickly exhausted, and each
year the village women would enlist the men in helping clear
the fields which were then burned over in the slash-and-burn
pattern which helped reconstitute the soils for planting
again.... Where the simple horticultural methods continued to
be used, women continued as the primary farmers, always
with their children as helpers. In a few of these societies
women continued also in the positions of power; these are
usually the tribes labeled by ethnologists as matrilocal.”

Elise Boulding, historian, The Underside of History: A View of
Women Through Time, 1976

The agricultural methods of tropical areas described in the passage best illustrate which of the following continuities in world history?

10 / 15

Questions refer to the passage below.

“The agriculture practiced by these first women farmers and
their children, producing enough food for subsistence only,
must be distinguished from that agriculture which developed
out of subsistence farming and which produced surpluses and
fed nonfarming populations in towns. The first type is
commonly called horticulture and is carried out with hand
tools only. The second is agriculture proper, and involves
intensive cultivation with the use of the plow and (where
necessary) irrigation. In areas like the hilly flanks of the
fertile crescent in the Middle East, horticulture moved fairly
rapidly into agriculture as it spread to the fertile plains. As we
shall see, trading centers grew into towns and cities needing
food from the countryside. Women and children could not
unaided produce the necessary surpluses, and by the time the
digging stick had turned into an animal-drawn plow, they
were no longer the primary workers of the fields.

The simpler form of farming continued in areas where the
soil was less fertile, and particularly in the tropical forest
areas of Africa. Here soils were quickly exhausted, and each
year the village women would enlist the men in helping clear
the fields which were then burned over in the slash-and-burn
pattern which helped reconstitute the soils for planting
again.... Where the simple horticultural methods continued to
be used, women continued as the primary farmers, always
with their children as helpers. In a few of these societies
women continued also in the positions of power; these are
usually the tribes labeled by ethnologists as matrilocal.”

Elise Boulding, historian, The Underside of History: A View of
Women Through Time, 1976

Based on the passage, it can be inferred that patriarchal societies were more likely to develop in which of the following?

11 / 15

Questions refer to the excerpt below.

“Hail to thee, O Nile! Who manifests thyself over this land,
and comes to give life to Egypt! Mysterious is thy issuing
forth from the darkness, on this day whereon it is celebrated!
Watering the orchards created by Re, to cause all the cattle to
live, you give the earth to drink, inexhaustible one! Path that
descends from the sky, loving the bread of Seb and the first-
fruits of Nepera, You cause the workshops of Ptah to prosper!
Lord of the fish, during the inundation, no bird alights on the
crops. You create the grain, you bring forth the barley,
assuring perpetuity to the temples. If you cease your toil and
your work, then all that exists is in anguish. If the gods suffer
in heaven, then the faces of men waste away.”
            Excerpt from Hymn to the Nile, c. 2100 B.C.E

The power of the deities described in the passage most strongly supports which of the following statements about the Nile River civilization?

12 / 15

Questions refer to the excerpt below.

“Hail to thee, O Nile! Who manifests thyself over this land,
and comes to give life to Egypt! Mysterious is thy issuing
forth from the darkness, on this day whereon it is celebrated!
Watering the orchards created by Re, to cause all the cattle to
live, you give the earth to drink, inexhaustible one! Path that
descends from the sky, loving the bread of Seb and the first-
fruits of Nepera, You cause the workshops of Ptah to prosper!
Lord of the fish, during the inundation, no bird alights on the
crops. You create the grain, you bring forth the barley,
assuring perpetuity to the temples. If you cease your toil and
your work, then all that exists is in anguish. If the gods suffer
in heaven, then the faces of men waste away.”
            Excerpt from Hymn to the Nile, c. 2100 B.C.E

A historian would most likely use this passage to illustrate which of the following?

13 / 15

Questions refer to the excerpt below.

“Hail to thee, O Nile! Who manifests thyself over this land,
and comes to give life to Egypt! Mysterious is thy issuing
forth from the darkness, on this day whereon it is celebrated!
Watering the orchards created by Re, to cause all the cattle to
live, you give the earth to drink, inexhaustible one! Path that
descends from the sky, loving the bread of Seb and the first-
fruits of Nepera, You cause the workshops of Ptah to prosper!
Lord of the fish, during the inundation, no bird alights on the
crops. You create the grain, you bring forth the barley,
assuring perpetuity to the temples. If you cease your toil and
your work, then all that exists is in anguish. If the gods suffer
in heaven, then the faces of men waste away.”
            Excerpt from Hymn to the Nile, c. 2100 B.C.E

Which of the following was an important similarity between agricultural communities, such as those along the Nile, and pastoral societies in this era?

14 / 15

Questions refer to the passage below.

“In Mesopotamia, the flood was the enemy. The
Mesopotamian deities who ruled the waters, Nin-Gursu and
Tiamat, were feared. The forces of nature were often evil.
Life was a struggle. In Egypt, on the other hand, life was
viewed as a cooperation with nature. Even the Egyptian god
of the flood, Hapi, was a helpful deity, who provided the
people’s daily bread. Egyptian priests and priestesses were
much more at ease with their world than were their
Mesopotamia counterparts. And, partly because of their
different experiences with the rivers, the Mesopotamians
developed a civilization based on cities, while the Egyptians
did not. From the first Sumerian city-states on the lower
Euphrates to the later northern Mesopotamian capital of
Babylon, civilization was the product and expression of city
life. Egyptian civilization, in contrast, was the creation of the
pharaoh’s court rather than of cities. Beyond the court, which
was moved from one location to another, Egypt remained a
country of peasant villages.”

Kevin Reilly, world historian, The West and the World: A
History of Civilization, 1989

Based on Reilly’s argument, belief systems of Mesopotamia and Egypt were most clearly influenced by which of the following?

15 / 15

Questions refer to the passage below.

“In Mesopotamia, the flood was the enemy. The
Mesopotamian deities who ruled the waters, Nin-Gursu and
Tiamat, were feared. The forces of nature were often evil.
Life was a struggle. In Egypt, on the other hand, life was
viewed as a cooperation with nature. Even the Egyptian god
of the flood, Hapi, was a helpful deity, who provided the
people’s daily bread. Egyptian priests and priestesses were
much more at ease with their world than were their
Mesopotamia counterparts. And, partly because of their
different experiences with the rivers, the Mesopotamians
developed a civilization based on cities, while the Egyptians
did not. From the first Sumerian city-states on the lower
Euphrates to the later northern Mesopotamian capital of
Babylon, civilization was the product and expression of city
life. Egyptian civilization, in contrast, was the creation of the
pharaoh’s court rather than of cities. Beyond the court, which
was moved from one location to another, Egypt remained a
country of peasant villages.”

Kevin Reilly, world historian, The West and the World: A
History of Civilization, 1989

The passage best illustrates which of the following processes in the period before 600 B.C.E.?

Your score is

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