BLS Pretest Chapter 5 BLS for Infants (0 to 12 months)

BLS Pretest Chapter 5 BLS for Infants (0 to 12 months) Quiz Questions Answer with explanation. This Basic Life Support (BLS) Chapter 5 Practice test is based on the later American Heart Association (AHA) guideline.

These questions cover the key concepts from Chapter 5 on BLS for Infants, including one-rescuer and two-rescuer BLS, infant ventilation, and self-assessment topics.

BLS Pretest Chapter 5 BLS for Infants (0 to 12 months)

 BLS for Infants (0 to 12 months)

Where should you check for a pulse in an infant?

  • (A) Carotid artery
  • (B) Radial artery
  • (C) Brachial artery
  • (D) Femoral artery

View Answer
Answer: (C) Explanation: The brachial artery, located on the inside of the upper arm between the infant’s elbow and shoulder, is the preferred site to check for a pulse in an infant.

What is the recommended compression depth for infant CPR?

  • (A) At least 1 inch
  • (B) At least 1.5 inches
  • (C) At least 2 inches
  • (D) At least 2.5 inches

View Answer
Answer: (B) Explanation: The recommended compression depth for infant CPR is about 1.5 inches (4 cm), which is approximately one-third of the chest depth.

When performing CPR on an infant, what is the correct compression rate?

  • (A) 80-100 compressions per minute
  • (B) 90-110 compressions per minute
  • (C) 100-120 compressions per minute
  • (D) 110-130 compressions per minute

View Answer
Answer: (C) Explanation: The correct compression rate for infant CPR is 100-120 compressions per minute to ensure adequate blood flow.

One-Rescuer BLS for Infants

What is the first step you should take if you find an unresponsive infant?

  • (A) Start chest compressions
  • (B) Check for breathing
  • (C) Call 911/EMS
  • (D) Tap the heel of their foot and talk loudly

View Answer
Answer: (D) Explanation: The first step is to tap the heel of the infant’s foot and talk loudly to determine if they are responsive.

If an infant is unresponsive and not breathing normally, what should you do next?

  • (A) Check for a pulse
  • (B) Start rescue breaths
  • (C) Yell for help
  • (D) Start chest compressions

View Answer
Answer: (C) Explanation: If the infant is unresponsive and not breathing normally, you should yell for help to alert others and get assistance.

How many cycles of CPR should you perform before calling 911/EMS if you are alone with an unresponsive infant?

  • (A) 1 cycle
  • (B) 2 cycles
  • (C) 3 cycles
  • (D) 5 cycles

View Answer
Answer: (D) Explanation: You should perform about 5 cycles of CPR (approximately 2 minutes) before calling 911/EMS if you are alone with an unresponsive infant.

Two-Rescuer BLS for Infants

What is the compression to ventilation ratio for two-rescuer CPR on an infant?

  • (A) 15:1
  • (B) 15:2
  • (C) 30:1
  • (D) 30:2

View Answer
Answer: (B) Explanation: The compression to ventilation ratio for two-rescuer CPR on an infant is 15:2 to ensure adequate circulation and ventilation.

How should chest compressions be performed on an infant in a two-rescuer scenario?

  • (A) Using two fingers
  • (B) Using the heel of one hand
  • (C) Using two thumb-encircling hands
  • (D) Using both palms

View Answer
Answer: (C) Explanation: In a two-rescuer scenario, chest compressions on an infant should be performed using the two thumb-encircling hands method for better control and effectiveness.

Infant Ventilation

What is the correct method for providing mouth-to-mouth/nose ventilation to an infant?

  • (A) Cover only the mouth
  • (B) Cover only the nose
  • (C) Cover both the mouth and nose
  • (D) Alternate between the mouth and nose

View Answer
Answer: (C) Explanation: When providing mouth-to-mouth/nose ventilation to an infant, you should cover both the mouth and nose to ensure effective ventilation.

How should you open an infant’s airway for ventilation?

  • (A) Head-tilt/chin-lift maneuver
  • (B) Jaw-thrust maneuver
  • (C) Abdominal thrusts
  • (D) Back blows

View Answer
Answer: (A) Explanation: The head-tilt/chin-lift maneuver is used to open an infant’s airway for ventilation while avoiding hyperextension of the neck.

Additional MCQs for Infant BLS

How often should you provide rescue breaths to an infant with a pulse but no breathing?

  • (A) Every 3-5 seconds
  • (B) Every 6-8 seconds
  • (C) Every 10-12 seconds
  • (D) Every 15-20 seconds

View Answer
Answer: (A) Explanation: Rescue breaths should be provided every 3-5 seconds (about 12-20 breaths per minute) for an infant with a pulse but no breathing to ensure adequate oxygenation.

What should you do if the infant’s chest does not rise with rescue breaths?

  • (A) Give more breaths
  • (B) Check the airway for obstruction
  • (C) Continue chest compressions
  • (D) Increase the breath force

View Answer
Answer: (B) Explanation: If the infant’s chest does not rise with rescue breaths, check the airway for obstruction and reposition the head to ensure an open airway.

What is the appropriate action if an infant is choking and becomes unresponsive?

  • (A) Perform abdominal thrusts
  • (B) Start CPR and check for an object in the mouth
  • (C) Give back blows
  • (D) Perform a blind finger sweep

View Answer
Answer: (B) Explanation: If an infant is choking and becomes unresponsive, start CPR and check for an object in the mouth before giving rescue breaths.

When should you use an AED on an infant?

  • (A) Only if they are older than 6 months
  • (B) Only if they are over 10 kg
  • (C) As soon as it is available
  • (D) After 5 minutes of CPR

View Answer
Answer: (C) Explanation: An AED should be used on an infant as soon as it is available to increase the chances of survival.

What is the recommended action if the infant’s heart rate is less than 60 beats per minute with signs of poor perfusion?

  • (A) Start rescue breaths
  • (B) Start chest compressions
  • (C) Apply the AED
  • (D) Monitor and wait

View Answer
Answer: (B) Explanation: If the infant’s heart rate is less than 60 beats per minute with signs of poor perfusion, start chest compressions to improve circulation.

How should you position an infant’s head when providing rescue breaths?

  • (A) Slightly extended
  • (B) Fully extended
  • (C) Neutral position
  • (D) Tilted to the side

View Answer
Answer: (C) Explanation: The infant’s head should be in a neutral position when providing rescue breaths to ensure an open airway without hyperextension.

Self-Assessment for Infant BLS

What is the primary cause of cardiac arrest in infants?

  • (A) Heart disease
  • (B) Respiratory problems
  • (C) Trauma
  • (D) Drowning

View Answer
Answer: (B) Explanation: Respiratory problems are the primary cause of cardiac arrest in infants, making early intervention critical.

What is the first step in the Pediatric Chain of Survival for infants?

  • (A) Early CPR
  • (B) Early defibrillation
  • (C) Prevention
  • (D) Rapid EMS activation

View Answer
Answer: (C) Explanation: Prevention is the first step in the Pediatric Chain of Survival for infants to reduce the risk of respiratory problems leading to cardiac arrest.

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