AP World History Practice Test Chapter 1

AP World History Practice Test Chapter 1: You can also download Advanced Placement exam full-length review practice test in printable pdf.

The AP World History Prep for Practice Test for Chapter 1 is a rigorous and comprehensive examination designed to test your understanding and recall of the foundational concepts and significant events of global history. This chapter primarily delves into the early stages of human history, taking you from the Paleolithic era to the dawn of civilizations in Mesopotamia and Egypt.

This practice test is an invaluable resource for any student preparing for the AP World History exam. It is structured to reflect the format and rigor of the actual AP exam, thereby offering you an authentic testing experience. It includes multiple-choice questions, short answer prompts, and essay questions, each aimed at testing different aspects of your understanding of the chapter’s content.

The multiple-choice section assesses your factual knowledge and comprehension of major events, movements, and developments from the chapter. Questions in this section may require you to identify significant figures, understand geographical contexts, or recall specific historical events.

AP World History Practice Test Chapter 1

Chapter 1
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AP World History Practice Test Chapter 1

AP World History Practice Test

Chapter 1: The Peopling of the Earth and the Paleolithic Age
Total Items: 15 MCQs
Time Limit: N/A

1 / 15

Questions 1–4 refer to the map below.

Which of the following conclusions can be supported by the map?

2 / 15

Which of the following most directly contributed to the movement of people as reflected on the map?

3 / 15

Which of the following was most likely a direct result of the patterns reflected on the map?

4 / 15

Which of the following characterizes the nature of early human societies in the era depicted on the map?

5 / 15

Questions 5–7 refer to the following two images.

The objects in Image 1 best support which of the following conclusions about life in the Paleolithic Age?

 

6 / 15

Questions 5–7 refer to the following two images.

The drawings shown in Image 2 best illustrate which of the following about early humans?

 

7 / 15

Questions 5–7 refer to the following two images.

When taken together, the two images best support which of the following conclusions?

 

8 / 15

Questions 8–10 refer to the passage below.

“Lower and Middle Paleolithic hominins [humans] were
capable of at least some innovation, of solving novel adaptive
problems by altering their behavior. They learned to cope
successfully with a wide range of environments, particularly
after 800,000 years ago when they began to establish
populations in the northern temperate zones. They also were
able to exploit stones with very different working properties
to produce tools, and to maintain a supply of tools and raw
materials even when suitable stone was scarce. The
proposition that early humans could maintain highly
conservative traditions over such long spans of time and over
such a large area implies a very high level of fidelity in
cultural transmission.”

L. S. Premo and Steven Kuhn, anthropologists, 2010

Based on Premo and Kuhn’s argument, why were humans of the Paleolithic Age able to produce stone tools consistently?

9 / 15

Questions 8–10 refer to the passage below.

“Lower and Middle Paleolithic hominins [humans] were
capable of at least some innovation, of solving novel adaptive
problems by altering their behavior. They learned to cope
successfully with a wide range of environments, particularly
after 800,000 years ago when they began to establish
populations in the northern temperate zones. They also were
able to exploit stones with very different working properties
to produce tools, and to maintain a supply of tools and raw
materials even when suitable stone was scarce. The
proposition that early humans could maintain highly
conservative traditions over such long spans of time and over
such a large area implies a very high level of fidelity in
cultural transmission.”

L. S. Premo and Steven Kuhn, anthropologists, 2010

The migrations described in the passage were most likely due to which of the following?

10 / 15

Questions 8–10 refer to the passage below.

“Lower and Middle Paleolithic hominins [humans] were
capable of at least some innovation, of solving novel adaptive
problems by altering their behavior. They learned to cope
successfully with a wide range of environments, particularly
after 800,000 years ago when they began to establish
populations in the northern temperate zones. They also were
able to exploit stones with very different working properties
to produce tools, and to maintain a supply of tools and raw
materials even when suitable stone was scarce. The
proposition that early humans could maintain highly
conservative traditions over such long spans of time and over
such a large area implies a very high level of fidelity in
cultural transmission.”

L. S. Premo and Steven Kuhn, anthropologists, 2010

Human behavior described in the passage best supports which of the following conclusions about the Paleolithic era?

11 / 15

Questions 11–12 refer to the image below.

The sculpture is best seen as evidence of which of the following?

12 / 15

Questions 11–12 refer to the image below.

A historian would most likely use the image as support for which of the following assertions?

13 / 15

Questions 13–15 refer to the passage below.

“Nomadic tribes ventured across the landscape, driven neither
by the spirit of adventure nor the pursuit of profit nor the
desire to accumulate property, but merely in hope of survival.
Traditions, habits, and customs were almost reverently passed
on from one generation to the next because, primitive and
unimaginative as these behavioral guidelines might appear
today, they were considered to be proven means of keeping
small groups of people alive. Relative isolation reduced
possibilities for advances in technological know how or what
institutionalists call the community of knowledge.

In this pre-scientific era, superstition and ceremonialism held
an enormous influence over the thought patterns people
possessed. Superstition was rampant as primitive humans
sought to understand that which they could not explain in
practical terms. Various gods were invented to account for
the inexplicable; the sun god, for example, was somewhat
logically worshipped as the source of life. Wind, water, and
thunder were similarly judged to possess divine attributes. In
place of critical or scientific reasoning, prehistoric humans
often resorted to imaginary explanation and false belief
rooted in lack of understanding (or, put more bluntly,
ignorance).”

Joseph E. Pluta, economist, “Technology vs. Institutions in
Prehistory,” Journal of Economic Issue

Based on Pluta’s argument, why did habits and rituals guide early humans?

14 / 15

Questions 13–15 refer to the passage below.

“Nomadic tribes ventured across the landscape, driven neither
by the spirit of adventure nor the pursuit of profit nor the
desire to accumulate property, but merely in hope of survival.
Traditions, habits, and customs were almost reverently passed
on from one generation to the next because, primitive and
unimaginative as these behavioral guidelines might appear
today, they were considered to be proven means of keeping
small groups of people alive. Relative isolation reduced
possibilities for advances in technological know how or what
institutionalists call the community of knowledge.

In this pre-scientific era, superstition and ceremonialism held
an enormous influence over the thought patterns people
possessed. Superstition was rampant as primitive humans
sought to understand that which they could not explain in
practical terms. Various gods were invented to account for
the inexplicable; the sun god, for example, was somewhat
logically worshipped as the source of life. Wind, water, and
thunder were similarly judged to possess divine attributes. In
place of critical or scientific reasoning, prehistoric humans
often resorted to imaginary explanation and false belief
rooted in lack of understanding (or, put more bluntly,
ignorance).”

Joseph E. Pluta, economist, “Technology vs. Institutions in
Prehistory,” Journal of Economic Issue

The beliefs about divine forces as discussed in the passage is best understood in the context of which of the following?

15 / 15

Questions 13–15 refer to the passage below.

“Nomadic tribes ventured across the landscape, driven neither
by the spirit of adventure nor the pursuit of profit nor the
desire to accumulate property, but merely in hope of survival.
Traditions, habits, and customs were almost reverently passed
on from one generation to the next because, primitive and
unimaginative as these behavioral guidelines might appear
today, they were considered to be proven means of keeping
small groups of people alive. Relative isolation reduced
possibilities for advances in technological know how or what
institutionalists call the community of knowledge.

In this pre-scientific era, superstition and ceremonialism held
an enormous influence over the thought patterns people
possessed. Superstition was rampant as primitive humans
sought to understand that which they could not explain in
practical terms. Various gods were invented to account for
the inexplicable; the sun god, for example, was somewhat
logically worshipped as the source of life. Wind, water, and
thunder were similarly judged to possess divine attributes. In
place of critical or scientific reasoning, prehistoric humans
often resorted to imaginary explanation and false belief
rooted in lack of understanding (or, put more bluntly,
ignorance).”

Joseph E. Pluta, economist, “Technology vs. Institutions in
Prehistory,” Journal of Economic Issue

Based on the passage and on your knowledge of world history, which of the following could be best inferred about the lifestyle of early humans?

Your score is

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