AP World History Practice Test Chapter 3

AP World History Practice Test Chapter 3 The Rise and Interactions of Early Agricultural, Pastoral, and Urban Societies: You can also download the Advanced Placement exam 2024 full-length review practice test in printable pdf.

As an effective study tool designed to evaluate your understanding and retention, our AP World History Prep Practice Test for Chapter 3 is an essential resource to help you ace your upcoming exams. This practice test specifically delves into the critical events, transformations, and civilizations that helped shape the world from 600 B.C.E. to 600 C.E., as covered in the AP World History curriculum.
The test aims to assess your knowledge of some of the most influential civilizations, including the Classical Civilizations of Rome, Greece, Persia, India, and China, their cultural practices, political structures, economic systems, and societal organizations. Furthermore, it looks into key themes such as religious and philosophical systems, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Confucianism.

AP World History Practice Test Chapter 3

Chapter 3
37

AP World History Practice Test Chapter 3

AP World History Practice Test

Chapter 3: The Rise and Interactions of Early Agricultural, Pastoral, and Urban Societies
Total Items: 15 MCQs
Time Limit: N/A

1 / 15

Questions refer to the passage below.

“In Mesopotamia, the flood was the enemy. The
Mesopotamian deities who ruled the waters, Nin-Gursu and
Tiamat, were feared. The forces of nature were often evil.
Life was a struggle. In Egypt, on the other hand, life was
viewed as a cooperation with nature. Even the Egyptian god
of the flood, Hapi, was a helpful deity, who provided the
people’s daily bread. Egyptian priests and priestesses were
much more at ease with their world than were their
Mesopotamia counterparts. And, partly because of their
different experiences with the rivers, the Mesopotamians
developed a civilization based on cities, while the Egyptians
did not. From the first Sumerian city-states on the lower
Euphrates to the later northern Mesopotamian capital of
Babylon, civilization was the product and expression of city
life. Egyptian civilization, in contrast, was the creation of the
pharaoh’s court rather than of cities. Beyond the court, which
was moved from one location to another, Egypt remained a
country of peasant villages.”

Kevin Reilly, world historian, The West and the World: A
History of Civilization, 1989

The passage best illustrates which of the following processes in the period before 600 B.C.E.?

2 / 15

Questions refer to the passage below.

195. Anyone assaulting his father shall suffer the loss of his
hands.
196. Anyone destroying the eye of another shall suffer the
loss of an eye as punishment therefor.
197. If anyone fractures the bones of another, the guilty one,
upon conviction, shall have his bones fractured in punishment
therefor.
198. If anyone destroys the eye of a freedman or fractures the
bones of a freedman, he, upon conviction thereof, is to pay 1
mina of silver.
199. If anyone destroys the eye or fractures the bones of
anyone’s slave, he, upon conviction thereof, is to pay half of
his value [to the owner of the slave].
200. If anyone knocks out the teeth of one, his equal [in
rank], his teeth are to be knocked out, upon conviction of the
offence.
201. If he has knocked out the teeth of a freedman, he is to
pay one-third of a mina of silver.
202. If anyone commits assault and battery upon the person
of another one of higher rank than himself, he is publicly to
receive 60 lashes with the oxhide [upon conviction of the
offence].”
Hammurabi’s Code, Babylonian legal code, 18th century B.C.E.

The consequences imposed by Hammurabi’s Code most strongly illustrates which of the following about Babylonian society?

3 / 15

Questions refer to the passage below.

195. Anyone assaulting his father shall suffer the loss of his
hands.
196. Anyone destroying the eye of another shall suffer the
loss of an eye as punishment therefor.
197. If anyone fractures the bones of another, the guilty one,
upon conviction, shall have his bones fractured in punishment
therefor.
198. If anyone destroys the eye of a freedman or fractures the
bones of a freedman, he, upon conviction thereof, is to pay 1
mina of silver.
199. If anyone destroys the eye or fractures the bones of
anyone’s slave, he, upon conviction thereof, is to pay half of
his value [to the owner of the slave].
200. If anyone knocks out the teeth of one, his equal [in
rank], his teeth are to be knocked out, upon conviction of the
offence.
201. If he has knocked out the teeth of a freedman, he is to
pay one-third of a mina of silver.
202. If anyone commits assault and battery upon the person
of another one of higher rank than himself, he is publicly to
receive 60 lashes with the oxhide [upon conviction of the
offence].”
Hammurabi’s Code, Babylonian legal code, 18th century B.C.E.

A historian would most likely use this passage to illustrate which of the following?

4 / 15

Questions refer to the passage below.

195. Anyone assaulting his father shall suffer the loss of his
hands.
196. Anyone destroying the eye of another shall suffer the
loss of an eye as punishment therefor.
197. If anyone fractures the bones of another, the guilty one,
upon conviction, shall have his bones fractured in punishment
therefor.
198. If anyone destroys the eye of a freedman or fractures the
bones of a freedman, he, upon conviction thereof, is to pay 1
mina of silver.
199. If anyone destroys the eye or fractures the bones of
anyone’s slave, he, upon conviction thereof, is to pay half of
his value [to the owner of the slave].
200. If anyone knocks out the teeth of one, his equal [in
rank], his teeth are to be knocked out, upon conviction of the
offence.
201. If he has knocked out the teeth of a freedman, he is to
pay one-third of a mina of silver.
202. If anyone commits assault and battery upon the person
of another one of higher rank than himself, he is publicly to
receive 60 lashes with the oxhide [upon conviction of the
offence].”
Hammurabi’s Code, Babylonian legal code, 18th century B.C.E.

In addition to establishing systems of rules as demonstrated in the passage, most rulers of early civilization used which of the following as a source of political legitimacy?

5 / 15

Questions are based on the following two images.

The carving in Image 1 best illustrates which of the following continuities in world history?

6 / 15

Questions are based on the following two images.

The carving in Image 2 best illustrates which of the following characteristics of early Mesopotamian civilization?

7 / 15

Questions are based on the following two images.

When taken together, the two images best support which of the following conclusions?

8 / 15

Questions refer to the passage below.

August is Wên the king;
Oh, to be reverenced in his glittering
light!
Mighty the mandate that Heaven gave
him.
The grandsons and sons of the Shang,
Shang’s grandsons and sons,
Their hosts were innumerable.
But God on high gave His command,
And by Zhou they were subdued.
By Zhou they were subdued;
Heaven’s charge is not forever.
The knights of Yin, big and little,
Made libations and offerings at the
capitol
What they did was to make libations
Dressed in skirted robe and close cap.
O chosen servants of the king,
May you never thus shame your
ancestors!
The Ode to King
Wên, c. 600 B.C.E.,
Zhou dynasty,
China

Which of the following conclusions about the Zhou dynasty is most directly supported by the passage?

9 / 15

Questions refer to the passage below.

August is Wên the king;
Oh, to be reverenced in his glittering
light!
Mighty the mandate that Heaven gave
him.
The grandsons and sons of the Shang,
Shang’s grandsons and sons,
Their hosts were innumerable.
But God on high gave His command,
And by Zhou they were subdued.
By Zhou they were subdued;
Heaven’s charge is not forever.
The knights of Yin, big and little,
Made libations and offerings at the
capitol
What they did was to make libations
Dressed in skirted robe and close cap.
O chosen servants of the king,
May you never thus shame your
ancestors!
The Ode to King
Wên, c. 600 B.C.E.,
Zhou dynasty,
China

Rulers of states similar to those described in the passage often depended on which of the following in the period before 600 B.C.E.?

10 / 15

Questions refer to the passage below.

August is Wên the king;
Oh, to be reverenced in his glittering
light!
Mighty the mandate that Heaven gave
him.
The grandsons and sons of the Shang,
Shang’s grandsons and sons,
Their hosts were innumerable.
But God on high gave His command,
And by Zhou they were subdued.
By Zhou they were subdued;
Heaven’s charge is not forever.
The knights of Yin, big and little,
Made libations and offerings at the
capitol
What they did was to make libations
Dressed in skirted robe and close cap.
O chosen servants of the king,
May you never thus shame your
ancestors!
The Ode to King
Wên, c. 600 B.C.E.,
Zhou dynasty,
China

Ideas similar to those expressed in the passage have directly contributed to the development of which of the following aspects of later Chinese imperial history?

11 / 15

Questions refer to the map below.

LONG-DISTANCE MIGRATIONS, C. 4000 B.C.E. TO C. 600 B.C.E.

Which of the following factors contributed most to movement of Indo-European and Bantu populations as shown on the map?

12 / 15

Questions refer to the map below.

LONG-DISTANCE MIGRATIONS, C. 4000 B.C.E. TO C. 600 B.C.E.

Based on the map and on your knowledge of world history, which of the following best describes the effect of the Bantu and Indo-European migrations?

13 / 15

Questions are based on the images below.

The object in Image 1 best illustrates which of the following characteristics of early civilizations?

14 / 15

Questions are based on the images below.

The object in Image 2 best illustrates which of the following continuities in world history?

15 / 15

Questions are based on the images below.

When taken together, the two images best support which of the following conclusions?

Your score is

See also: