AP World History Practice Test Chapter 4

AP World History Practice Test Chapter 4: The Development and Codification of Religious Traditions. You can also download the Advanced Placement exam 2024 full-length review practice test in printable pdf.

Engaging with our AP World History Practice Test for Chapter 4 is a strategic way to prepare yourself for your AP World History exam, reinforcing your understanding of pivotal historical events and transformations that significantly influenced the world from 600 C.E. to 1450 C.E. This period encapsulates the Post-Classical Era, an epoch marked by the rise and fall of empires, the expansion of trade networks, and dramatic shifts in cultural and religious landscapes.

This AP World History test prep delves into the understanding of crucial global processes and civilizations such as the Islamic Caliphates, Byzantine Empire, Mongol Empire, the Vikings in Europe, African Kingdoms, and the Civilizations of the Americas. It aims to test your grasp of their political structures, cultural contributions, economic systems, and the significant individuals associated with these societies.

AP World History Practice Test Chapter 4

Chapter 4
8

AP World History Practice Test Chapter 4

AP World History Practice Test

Chapter 4: The Development and Codification of Religious Traditions
Total Items: 23 MCQs
Time Limit: N/A

1 / 23

Questions refer to the passage below.

“I say: Promote the worthy and the capable without waiting
for them to rise through the ranks. Dismiss the unfit and
incapable without waiting for even a single moment...
Transform the ordinary people without waiting for
government controls. If social divisions are not yet set, then
take control of illuminating the proper bonds. Even the sons
and grandsons of kings, dukes, gentry, and grand ministers, if
they cannot submit to ritual and yi, should be assigned the
status of commoners. Even the sons and grandsons of
commoners, if they accumulate culture and learning, correct
their person and conduct, and can submit to ritual and yi,
should be assigned the status of prime minister, gentry, or
grand ministers. And so, for those engaging in vile teachings,
vile doctrines, vile works, and vile skills, and for those

among the common people who are rebellious and perverse,
give them each an occupation and teach them, and take a
while to wait for them.”

Xunzi, Chinese philosopher, circa 250 B.C.E.

A historian would most likely use this passage to illustrate which of the following?

2 / 23

Questions refer to the passage below.

“I say: Promote the worthy and the capable without waiting
for them to rise through the ranks. Dismiss the unfit and
incapable without waiting for even a single moment...
Transform the ordinary people without waiting for
government controls. If social divisions are not yet set, then
take control of illuminating the proper bonds. Even the sons
and grandsons of kings, dukes, gentry, and grand ministers, if
they cannot submit to ritual and yi, should be assigned the
status of commoners. Even the sons and grandsons of
commoners, if they accumulate culture and learning, correct
their person and conduct, and can submit to ritual and yi,
should be assigned the status of prime minister, gentry, or
grand ministers. And so, for those engaging in vile teachings,
vile doctrines, vile works, and vile skills, and for those

among the common people who are rebellious and perverse,
give them each an occupation and teach them, and take a
while to wait for them.”

Xunzi, Chinese philosopher, circa 250 B.C.E.

Ideas similar to those in the passage have directly contributed to the implementation of which of the following by the Han dynasty?

3 / 23

Questions refer to the passage below.

“I say: Promote the worthy and the capable without waiting
for them to rise through the ranks. Dismiss the unfit and
incapable without waiting for even a single moment...
Transform the ordinary people without waiting for
government controls. If social divisions are not yet set, then
take control of illuminating the proper bonds. Even the sons
and grandsons of kings, dukes, gentry, and grand ministers, if
they cannot submit to ritual and yi, should be assigned the
status of commoners. Even the sons and grandsons of
commoners, if they accumulate culture and learning, correct
their person and conduct, and can submit to ritual and yi,
should be assigned the status of prime minister, gentry, or
grand ministers. And so, for those engaging in vile teachings,
vile doctrines, vile works, and vile skills, and for those

among the common people who are rebellious and perverse,
give them each an occupation and teach them, and take a
while to wait for them.”

Xunzi, Chinese philosopher, circa 250 B.C.E.

According to the passage, Xunzi supported an approach to government that most clearly reflected the principles of

4 / 23

Questions refer to the following passage.

“God spoke, and these were his words: I am the Lord your
God who brought you out of Egypt, out of the land of slavery.

—You shall have no other god to set against me. You shall not
make a carved image for yourself nor the likeness of anything
in the heavens above, or on the earth below, or in the waters
under the earth.
—You shall not bow down to them or worship them; for I, the
Lord your God, am a jealous god. I punish the children for
the sins of the fathers to the third and fourth generations of
those who hate me. But I keep faith with thousands, with
those who love me and keep my commandments.
—You shall not make wrong use of the name of the Lord your
God; the Lord will not leave unpunished the man who
misuses his name.
—Remember to keep the Sabbath day holy. You have six days
to labor and do all your work. But the seventh day is a
Sabbath of the Lord your God; that day you shall not do any
work, you, your son or your daughter, your slave or your
slave-girl, your cattle or the alien within your gates; for in six
days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is
in them, and on the seventh day he rested. Therefore the Lord
blessed the Sabbath day and declared it holy.
—Honor your father and your mother, that you may live long in
the land which the Lord your God is giving you.
—You shall not commit murder.
—You shall not commit adultery.
—You shall not steal.
—You shall not give false evidence against your neighbor.
—You shall not covet your neighbor’s house; you shall not
covet your neighbor’s wife, his slave, his slave-girl, his ox,
his [donkey], or anything that belongs to him.”

Ten Commandments,” Old Testament of the Bible, Exodus
20:1–17

Ideas similar to those expressed in the passage directly contributed to which of the following in the period 600– 1450 C.E.?

5 / 23

Questions refer to the following passage.

“God spoke, and these were his words: I am the Lord your
God who brought you out of Egypt, out of the land of slavery.

—You shall have no other god to set against me. You shall not
make a carved image for yourself nor the likeness of anything
in the heavens above, or on the earth below, or in the waters
under the earth.
—You shall not bow down to them or worship them; for I, the
Lord your God, am a jealous god. I punish the children for
the sins of the fathers to the third and fourth generations of
those who hate me. But I keep faith with thousands, with
those who love me and keep my commandments.
—You shall not make wrong use of the name of the Lord your
God; the Lord will not leave unpunished the man who
misuses his name.
—Remember to keep the Sabbath day holy. You have six days
to labor and do all your work. But the seventh day is a
Sabbath of the Lord your God; that day you shall not do any
work, you, your son or your daughter, your slave or your
slave-girl, your cattle or the alien within your gates; for in six
days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is
in them, and on the seventh day he rested. Therefore the Lord
blessed the Sabbath day and declared it holy.
—Honor your father and your mother, that you may live long in
the land which the Lord your God is giving you.
—You shall not commit murder.
—You shall not commit adultery.
—You shall not steal.
—You shall not give false evidence against your neighbor.
—You shall not covet your neighbor’s house; you shall not
covet your neighbor’s wife, his slave, his slave-girl, his ox,
his [donkey], or anything that belongs to him.”

Ten Commandments,” Old Testament of the Bible, Exodus
20:1–17

The passage best illustrates which of the following patterns in the period 600 B.C.E.–600 C.E.?

6 / 23

Questions refer to the following passage.

“God spoke, and these were his words: I am the Lord your
God who brought you out of Egypt, out of the land of slavery.

—You shall have no other god to set against me. You shall not
make a carved image for yourself nor the likeness of anything
in the heavens above, or on the earth below, or in the waters
under the earth.
—You shall not bow down to them or worship them; for I, the
Lord your God, am a jealous god. I punish the children for
the sins of the fathers to the third and fourth generations of
those who hate me. But I keep faith with thousands, with
those who love me and keep my commandments.
—You shall not make wrong use of the name of the Lord your
God; the Lord will not leave unpunished the man who
misuses his name.
—Remember to keep the Sabbath day holy. You have six days
to labor and do all your work. But the seventh day is a
Sabbath of the Lord your God; that day you shall not do any
work, you, your son or your daughter, your slave or your
slave-girl, your cattle or the alien within your gates; for in six
days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is
in them, and on the seventh day he rested. Therefore the Lord
blessed the Sabbath day and declared it holy.
—Honor your father and your mother, that you may live long in
the land which the Lord your God is giving you.
—You shall not commit murder.
—You shall not commit adultery.
—You shall not steal.
—You shall not give false evidence against your neighbor.
—You shall not covet your neighbor’s house; you shall not
covet your neighbor’s wife, his slave, his slave-girl, his ox,
his [donkey], or anything that belongs to him.”

Ten Commandments,” Old Testament of the Bible, Exodus
20:1–17

The guidelines described in the passage are best understood in the context of which of the following?

7 / 23

Questions refer to the map below.

Which of the following best describes how the spread of Buddhism affected its core beliefs?

8 / 23

Questions refer to the map below.

Which of the following factors contributed most to the spread of Christianity as depicted on the map?

9 / 23

Questions refer to the map below.

The paths of Christianity and Buddhism as shown on the map best reflect which of the following?

10 / 23

Questions refer to the passage below.

“The self embodied in the body of every
being is indestructible;
you have no cause to grieve for all these
creatures, Arjuna!
Look to your own duty; do not tremble
before it;
Nothing is better for a warrior than a
battle of sacred duty.
The doors of heaven open for warriors
who rejoice
to have a battle like this thrust on them
by chance.
If you fail to wage this war of sacred
duty,
you will abandon your own duty and
fame only to gain evil.
People will tell of your undying shame,
and for a man of honor, shame is worse
than death.”

Bhagavad Gita,
ancient Indian
text, circa 4th
century B.C.E.

Compared to the actions described in the passage, Buddhist teachings differed in that they

11 / 23

Questions refer to the passage below.

“The self embodied in the body of every
being is indestructible;
you have no cause to grieve for all these
creatures, Arjuna!
Look to your own duty; do not tremble
before it;
Nothing is better for a warrior than a
battle of sacred duty.
The doors of heaven open for warriors
who rejoice
to have a battle like this thrust on them
by chance.
If you fail to wage this war of sacred
duty,
you will abandon your own duty and
fame only to gain evil.
People will tell of your undying shame,
and for a man of honor, shame is worse
than death.”

Bhagavad Gita,
ancient Indian
text, circa 4th
century B.C.E.

The ideas expressed in the passage contributed to the development of which of the following?

12 / 23

Questions refer to the passage below.

“The self embodied in the body of every
being is indestructible;
you have no cause to grieve for all these
creatures, Arjuna!
Look to your own duty; do not tremble
before it;
Nothing is better for a warrior than a
battle of sacred duty.
The doors of heaven open for warriors
who rejoice
to have a battle like this thrust on them
by chance.
If you fail to wage this war of sacred
duty,
you will abandon your own duty and
fame only to gain evil.
People will tell of your undying shame,
and for a man of honor, shame is worse
than death.”

Bhagavad Gita,
ancient Indian
text, circa 4th
century B.C.E.

Which of the following conclusions about Indian society during the period before 600 B.C.E. is most directly supported by the passage?

13 / 23

Questions refer to the passage below.

“The self embodied in the body of every
being is indestructible;
you have no cause to grieve for all these
creatures, Arjuna!
Look to your own duty; do not tremble
before it;
Nothing is better for a warrior than a
battle of sacred duty.
The doors of heaven open for warriors
who rejoice
to have a battle like this thrust on them
by chance.
If you fail to wage this war of sacred
duty,
you will abandon your own duty and
fame only to gain evil.
People will tell of your undying shame,
and for a man of honor, shame is worse
than death.”

Bhagavad Gita,
ancient Indian
text, circa 4th
century B.C.E.

Ideas expressed in the passage formed the basis of which of the following belief systems?

14 / 23

Questions are based on the excerpt below.

“I approached Ekron and slew the governors and nobles who
had rebelled, and hung their bodies on stakes around the city.
The inhabitants who rebelled and treated [Assyria] lightly I
counted as spoil. The rest of them, who were not guilty of
rebellion and contempt, for whom there was no punishment, I
declared their pardon. Padi, their king, I brought out to
Jerusalem, set him on the royal throne over them, and
imposed upon him my royal tribute. As for Hezekiah the
Judahite, who did not submit to my yoke: forty-six of his
strong, walled cities, as well as the small towns in their area,
which were without number, by levelling with battering-rams
and by bringing up siege-engines, and by attacking and
storming on foot, by mines, tunnels, and breeches, I besieged
and took them. 200,150 people, great and small, male and
female, horses, mules, asses, camels, cattle, and sheep
without number . . .”
Excerpt from The Sennacherib Prism, an Assyrian account of
their siege of Jerusalem, circa 701 B.C.E

Which of the following best describes an important long- term effect of the expansion of the Assyrian Empire?

15 / 23

Questions are based on the excerpt below.

“I approached Ekron and slew the governors and nobles who
had rebelled, and hung their bodies on stakes around the city.
The inhabitants who rebelled and treated [Assyria] lightly I
counted as spoil. The rest of them, who were not guilty of
rebellion and contempt, for whom there was no punishment, I
declared their pardon. Padi, their king, I brought out to
Jerusalem, set him on the royal throne over them, and
imposed upon him my royal tribute. As for Hezekiah the
Judahite, who did not submit to my yoke: forty-six of his
strong, walled cities, as well as the small towns in their area,
which were without number, by levelling with battering-rams
and by bringing up siege-engines, and by attacking and
storming on foot, by mines, tunnels, and breeches, I besieged
and took them. 200,150 people, great and small, male and
female, horses, mules, asses, camels, cattle, and sheep
without number . . .”
Excerpt from The Sennacherib Prism, an Assyrian account of
their siege of Jerusalem, circa 701 B.C.E

Based on the excerpt, which of the following can be inferred about Assyrian military policies?

16 / 23

Questions are based on the excerpt below.

“I approached Ekron and slew the governors and nobles who
had rebelled, and hung their bodies on stakes around the city.
The inhabitants who rebelled and treated [Assyria] lightly I
counted as spoil. The rest of them, who were not guilty of
rebellion and contempt, for whom there was no punishment, I
declared their pardon. Padi, their king, I brought out to
Jerusalem, set him on the royal throne over them, and
imposed upon him my royal tribute. As for Hezekiah the
Judahite, who did not submit to my yoke: forty-six of his
strong, walled cities, as well as the small towns in their area,
which were without number, by levelling with battering-rams
and by bringing up siege-engines, and by attacking and
storming on foot, by mines, tunnels, and breeches, I besieged
and took them. 200,150 people, great and small, male and
female, horses, mules, asses, camels, cattle, and sheep
without number . . .”
Excerpt from The Sennacherib Prism, an Assyrian account of
their siege of Jerusalem, circa 701 B.C.E

A historian would most likely use this excerpt to illustrate which of the following about the period before 600 B.C.E.?

17 / 23

Questions are based on the images below.

When taken together, the two images best support which of the following continuities in world history?

18 / 23

Questions are based on the images below.

The object in Image 2 best illustrates which of the following patterns in world history?

19 / 23

Questions are based on the images below.

The building in Image 1 best illustrates which of the following processes in world history?

20 / 23

Questions refer to the excerpts below.

[Excerpt 1] “Beloved-of-the-Gods, King Piyadasi [Ashoka],
speaks thus: To do good is difficult. One who does good first
does something hard to do. I have done many good deeds,
and, if my sons, grandsons and their descendants up to the
end of the world act in like manner, they too will do much
good. But whoever amongst them neglects this, they will do
evil. Truly, it is easy to do evil . . . .”
[Excerpt 2] “Beloved-of-the-Gods, King Piyadasi, desires
that all religions should reside everywhere, for all of them
desire self-control and purity of heart. But people have
various desires and various passions, and they may practice
all of what they should or only a part of it. But one who
receives great gifts yet is lacking in self-control, purity of
heart, gratitude and firm devotion, such a person is mean.”
Excerpts from Edicts of Mauryan Emperor Ashoka (reigned 269
B.C.E. to 232 B.C.E.)

The edicts issued by Ashoka most clearly reflect which of the following patterns in world history?

21 / 23

Questions refer to the excerpts below.

[Excerpt 1] “Beloved-of-the-Gods, King Piyadasi [Ashoka],
speaks thus: To do good is difficult. One who does good first
does something hard to do. I have done many good deeds,
and, if my sons, grandsons and their descendants up to the
end of the world act in like manner, they too will do much
good. But whoever amongst them neglects this, they will do
evil. Truly, it is easy to do evil . . . .”
[Excerpt 2] “Beloved-of-the-Gods, King Piyadasi, desires
that all religions should reside everywhere, for all of them
desire self-control and purity of heart. But people have
various desires and various passions, and they may practice
all of what they should or only a part of it. But one who
receives great gifts yet is lacking in self-control, purity of
heart, gratitude and firm devotion, such a person is mean.”
Excerpts from Edicts of Mauryan Emperor Ashoka (reigned 269
B.C.E. to 232 B.C.E.)

The practice of religion as described in the second excerpt is best understood in the context of which of the following?

22 / 23

Questions refer to the excerpts below.

[Excerpt 1] “Beloved-of-the-Gods, King Piyadasi [Ashoka],
speaks thus: To do good is difficult. One who does good first
does something hard to do. I have done many good deeds,
and, if my sons, grandsons and their descendants up to the
end of the world act in like manner, they too will do much
good. But whoever amongst them neglects this, they will do
evil. Truly, it is easy to do evil . . . .”
[Excerpt 2] “Beloved-of-the-Gods, King Piyadasi, desires
that all religions should reside everywhere, for all of them
desire self-control and purity of heart. But people have
various desires and various passions, and they may practice
all of what they should or only a part of it. But one who
receives great gifts yet is lacking in self-control, purity of
heart, gratitude and firm devotion, such a person is mean.”
Excerpts from Edicts of Mauryan Emperor Ashoka (reigned 269
B.C.E. to 232 B.C.E.)

The discussion of good deeds referred to in the first excerpt was most likely influenced by which of the following developments in the period before 600 B.C.E.?

23 / 23

Questions refer to the passage below.

“I say: Promote the worthy and the capable without waiting
for them to rise through the ranks. Dismiss the unfit and
incapable without waiting for even a single moment...
Transform the ordinary people without waiting for
government controls. If social divisions are not yet set, then
take control of illuminating the proper bonds. Even the sons
and grandsons of kings, dukes, gentry, and grand ministers, if
they cannot submit to ritual and yi, should be assigned the
status of commoners. Even the sons and grandsons of
commoners, if they accumulate culture and learning, correct
their person and conduct, and can submit to ritual and yi,
should be assigned the status of prime minister, gentry, or
grand ministers. And so, for those engaging in vile teachings,
vile doctrines, vile works, and vile skills, and for those

among the common people who are rebellious and perverse,
give them each an occupation and teach them, and take a
while to wait for them.”

Xunzi, Chinese philosopher, circa 250 B.C.E.

Xunzi’s idealized vision of Chinese society as described in the passage differs most strongly from the values of which of the following belief systems?

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